Writing for Success in College and Beyond

Writing for Success in College and Beyond (Denise Comer, Duke University) creates a dynamic and effective workshop environment for students and teachers in the first year composition course. Through practice and participation, students learn the art and discipline of writing through a project oriented, interdisciplinary approach. Here as an English Composition Textbook for today.


Overview

Writing for Success in College and Beyond

Dr. Denise Comer, Duke University

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Writing for Success in College and Beyond is a dynamic and practical English Composition textbook; an introduction to the art and discipline of written expression. Students will learn how to read critically, conduct research, develop arguments, integrate and cite evidence, draft and revise writing, and craft powerful prose. This innovative new title creates a writing lab environment and includes an integrated toolset for idea generation, drafting, revisions, peer review, finishing and instructor feedback.

Our English Composition textbook is a highly interactive writing workshop structured around four major writing projects and focusing on six broad thematic areas. Engaged with and inspired by their selected source material, students learn to pose questions, interact with the works of others, and build arguments. Each writing project contains smaller, sequenced components that are categorized into phases that will extend across chapters. The approach emphasizes practice and participation, and is based on the author’s experience running the undergraduate writing lab at Duke University.

Writing for Success in College and Beyond has a top author with an innovative, yet proven approach, a richly interactive online toolset, and the attentive service of a cutting-edge, independent publisher for today. Whether you teach online, face-to-face, or in a hybrid environment, make Writing for Success in College and Beyond your English Composition textbook today.

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About the author

Dr. Denise Comer, Associate Professor of the Practice of Writing Studies and Director of First-Year Writing at Duke University, has over fifteen years of experience teaching first-year writing students the strategies, confidence, and skills they need to be successful writers in and beyond the academy. Her leadership, collaboration, and innovation designing first-year writing courses and training first-year writing faculty have helped earn Duke University’s Thompson Writing Program national recognition with the 2006 CCCC Writing Program Certificate of Excellence and the 2012 U.S. News & World Report, which commended Duke for “making the writing process a priority at all levels of instruction and across the curriculum.”

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English Composition textbook
English Composition textbook
English Composition textbook

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Table of Contents

English Composition Textbook

Writing for Success in College and Beyond

INTRODUCTION

  • Instructor Welcome
  • Course Preamble
  • Course Tools
  • Instructor Guide

CHAPTER 01: The writing Process

  • 1.01 Introduction
  • 1.02 Become a Better Writer
  • 1.04 The Writing Process
  • 1.05 Phases of the Writing Process
  • 1.12 Encountering and Overcoming Writing Challenges
  • 1.13 Joys of Writing; Conclusion

CHAPTER 02: In-Depth Reading and Critical Review

  • Writing Project 1: Critical Reviews
  • 2.01 What is a Critical Review?
  • 2.02 Key Writing Moves for Critical Reviews
  • 2.07 Writerly Choices and Critical Reviews
  • 2.08 Examples of Critical Reviews
  • 2.09 Strategies for In-Depth Reading
  • 2.16 Key Aspects of an Argument
  • 2.17 The Art and Value of Conversation
  • 2.18 What is a Fully Formed Draft? Conclusion

CHAPTER 03: The Social Nature of Writing: Citing the Work of Others & Providing and Receiving Feedback

  • 3.01 Reminder Sequence for Project 1; What is Citation?
  • 3.04 Reasons for Citing the Work of Others
  • 3.05 How to Cite the Work of Others
  • 3.06 What is Plagiarism?
  • 3.07 Reasons Plagiarism Occurs
  • 3.09 The Importance of Feedback
  • 3.10 Purposes for Feedback
  • 3.11 Sources of Feedback
  • 3.14 Providing Effective Feedback
  • 3.16 Formats for Exchanging Feedback

CHAPTER 04: Revising and Editing

  • 4.01 Reminder Sequence for Project 1; Revision
  • 4.02 Making Revision Effective
  • 4.03 Strategies for Revision
  • 4.06 Introductions: Aims and Features
  • 4.07 Conclusions: Aims and Features
  • 4.08 Editing
  • 4.09 Strategies for Editing
  • 4.10 Tackling Grammar Mistakes; Conclusion
  • African Modern Popular Music

CHAPTER 05: Working with Visual Texts

  • Writing Project 2: Visual Texts
  • 5.01 Visual Texts in Academic Writing
  • 5.02 The “Language of Images”
  • 5.03 Visual Rhetoric: Visual Texts as Arguments
  • 5.04 Visual Analysis
  • 5.05 Writerly Choices and Components of Visual Analysis
  • 5.06 Examples of Visual Analysis
  • 5.07 How to Read Visual Texts
  • 5.10 Criteria for Selecting a Visual Text to Analyze
  • 5.11 Phase 1 of Visual Analysis: Describing and Annotating a Visual Text; Conclusion

CHAPTER 06: Developing Effective Claims, Building Paragraphs, and Integrating and Citing Visual Components in Writing

  • 6.01 Reminder Sequence for Project 2; Moving from Observation to Analysis and Argument
  • 6.02 Creating Effective Claims
  • 6.03 Developing Effective Paragraphs
  • 6.04 Improving Flow: Paragraph Transitions
  • 6.05 Multimodal Composing
  • 6.06 Integrating Visual Texts into Written Texts
  • 6.08 Captioning and Labeling Visual Texts
  • 6.10 Writerly Considerations When Captioning or Labeling Visual Texts
  • 6.11 Citing Visual Texts
  • 6.12 Assignment 2f; Conclusion

CHAPTER 07: Considering Audience

  • 7.01 Reminder Sequence for Project 2; Considering Audience
  • 7.02 Considering Audience (Continued); Different Types of Readers: A Taxonomy
  • 7.05 Who Are Your Readers?
  • 7.08 Writer-Based Prose and Reader-Based Prose
  • 7.09 Developing Reader-Based Prose
  • 7.11 First-Person Pronouns and Academic Writing
  • 7.14 Transforming Sub-Optimal Reader Feedback into Optimal Reader Feedback for Revision
  • 7.16 Phase 3 of Visual Analysis; Revising and Editing; Conclusion

CHAPTER 08: Discovering Potential Argument Topics and Research Questions

  • 8.01 Reminder Sequence for Project 2
  • 8.02 Crafting Effective Titles
  • 8.03 Editing: Building Your Repertoire 1
  • 8.05 Transitioning from Writing Projects 1 and 2 to Writing Project 3
  • Writing Project 3: Research-Based Argument
  • 8.06 What is a Research-Based Argumentative Essay? Writerly Components of Research-Based Argumentative Essays
  • 8.08 Sample Research-Based Argumentative Essays
  • 8.09 Phase 1 of Writing Project 3; Discovering Potential Argument Topics
  • 8.12 Assignment 3a; Narrowing and Refining Argument Topics
  • 8.13 Socratic Questioning Heuristic
  • 8.14 Stasis Theory: Pre-Writing Strategy for Narrowing Potential Argument Topics
  • 8.15 The Four Stases: A Heuristic for Developing Potential Argument Topics
  • 8.16 Assignment 3b; Moving from Potential Argument Topic to Potential Research Question(s)
  • 8.17 Developing Effective Research Questions; Conclusion

CHAPTER 09: Conducting Research

  • 9.01 Reminder Sequence for Project 3
  • 9.02 Conducting Research
  • 9.04 Crafting a Research Proposal
  • 9.07 Writerly Choices and considerations with Research Proposals
  • 9.08 Examples of Research Proposals
  • 9.09 Research Methods
  • 9.10 Research Methods for Gathering Primary Research Materials
  • 9.13 What are Secondary Research Materials?
  • 9.14 Research Methods for Gathering Secondary Research Materials
  • 9.16 Helpful Hints as you Search for Secondary Research Materials
  • 9.18 Evaluating Secondary Research Materials
  • 9.19 What are Tertiary Research Materials?
  • 9.20 Annotated Bibliographies
  • 9.21 Writerly Choices and Considerations with Annotated Bibliographies
  • 9.22 Examples of Annotated Bibliographies
  • 9.24 Research Methods: Analyzing Research Materials
  • 9.26 Assignment 3e; Assignment 3f
  • 9.27 Assignment 3g; Conclusion

CHAPTER 10: Developing and Structuring an Argument

  • 10.01 Reminder Sequence for Project 3
  • 10.02 Moving from Research to Analysis and Argument
  • 10.03 What is a Literature Review?
  • 10.05 Writerly Choices and Considerations with Literature Reviews
  • 10.06 Understanding Literature Reviews
  • 10.07 Assignment 3h
  • 10.08 Pursuing your Research and Analysis
  • 10.09 Finding Space for your Contribution
  • 10.10 Structuring your Argument
  • 10.11 Classical Argument Structure
  • 10.12 Rogerian Argument Structure
  • 10.13 IMRAD Argument Structure
  • 10.15 Conclusion

CHAPTER 11: Convincing Your Readers: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, and Kairos

  • 11.01 Reminder Sequence for Project 3
  • 11.02 Convincing your Readers: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, and Kairos
  • 11.03 Ethos 1
  • 11.06 Constructing Ethos
  • 11.08 Examples of Ethos
  • 11.10 Pathos 1
  • 11.12 Constructing Pathos
  • 11.13 Examples of Pathos
  • 11.16 Logos 1
  • 11.18 Constructing Logos
  • 11.20 Examples of Logos
  • 11.22 Kairos 1
  • 11.24 Constructing Kairos
  • 11.25 Examples of Kairos
  • 11.27 Assignment 3k
  • 11.28 Assignment 3l
  • 11.29 Conclusion

CHAPTER 12: Reaching More Readers: Public Writing

  • 12.01 Reminder Sequence for Project 3
  • 12.02 Interim Writing Moments: What Writers Do While Waiting for Feedback
  • Writing Project 4: Public Writing
  • 12.03 What is Public Writing?
  • 12.04 Why Public Writing Matters
  • 12.05 Connecting Academic Research to Contemporary Events, Issues, and Debates
  • 12.06 Engaged Scholarship: Public Writing and Civic Engagement
  • 12.07 Public Writing: Forms and Genres
  • 12.11 Writerly Choices and Considerations with Public Writing
  • 12.13 Examples of Public Writing
  • 12.14 Assignment 4a; Assignment 4b
  • 12.15 Assignment 4c; Conclusion

CHAPTER 13: Polishing Your Prose: Style, Tone, Voice & Grammar

  • 13.01 Reminder Sequence for Project 3
  • 13.02 What is Voice?
  • 13.04 Examples of Voice
  • 13.06 Acknowledging Others
  • 13.07 What is Tone?
  • 13.09 What is Style?
  • 13.11 Examples of Style
  • 13.13 Grammar and Style
  • 13.14 Writing with an Accent: International and Multilingual Speakers of English
  • 13.15 Assignment 3p; Assignment 3q
  • 13.16 Reminder Sequence for Project 4; Assignment 4d
  • 13.17 Assignment 4e; Conclusion

CHAPTER 14: Verbal Arguments and Presentations

  • 14.01 Reminder Sequence for Project 4
  • 14.02 Verbal Arguments, Presentations & Academic Writing
  • 14.03 Verbal Argument Assignment
  • 14.04 Verbal Arguments
  • 14.07 Writerly Choices and Considerations with Verbal Argument
  • 14.10 Examples of Verbal Argument
  • 14.11 Interacting with your Listeners
  • 14.12 Audiovisual Components of Verbal Arguments
  • 14.17 Nerves, Jitters, Anxiety, and Public Speaking
  • 14.18 Introducing Oneself in Verbal Arguments: Creating Brief Biographical Introductions
  • 14.20 Verbal Argument Assignment A and B
  • 14.21 Verbal Argument Assignment C
  • 14.22 Verbal Argument Assignment D, E, and F
  • 14.23 Conclusion

CHAPTER 15: Cultivating Writing Transfer: Reflecting and Looking Forward

    • 15.01 Writing Transfer
    • 15.03 Strategies for Cultivating Writing Transfer
    • 15.05 Writing Portfolio Assignment
    • 15.06 What are Writing Portfolios?
    • 15.08 Writerly Considerations and Choices with Writing Portfolios
    • 15.12 Examples of Writing Portfolios
    • 15.13 Compiling, Selecting, and Organizing Materials for a Writing Portfolio
    • 15.15 Writing Portfolio Assignment A
    • 15.16 Introductory Components of Writing Portfolios
    • 15.20 Curatorial Elements of Writing Portfolios
    • 15.21 Moving Forward with Writing: Reflection and Transfer
    • 15.22 Writing Portfolio Assignment B
    • 15.23 Writing Portfolio Assignment C
    • 15.24 Writing Portfolio Assignment D, E, and F
    • 15.25 Extending Research and Writing in your Thematic Area of Inquiry
    • 15.26 Opportunities for Publication, Presentation, and Award
    • 15.27 Conclusion

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